From Planet Fitness' 'No Pintimidation' campaing to encourage funny social media content.

Small business owners might worry their social media marketing practices for Pinterest don’t stack up to bigger brands. With dedicated marketing teams, some companies have the resources to take professional photos of staged products, find inspiring images that represent services and manage boards so they’re always streaming with ideas. However, a new survey from NBC’s the Today Show reveals small business owners have a trick up their sleeves – they’re not perfect. 

According to Today’s recent survey of 4,000 mothers in the United States, 42 percent suffer from ‘Pinterest stress’ when they see idealistic images of gardens, home decor, craft projects and recipes.

“It tricks you into thinking that everyone is baking their own bread,” said photographer and blogger Jenna Andersen, who is also a mother of two in California. “Pinterest is largely a site of unrealized dreams.”

42 percent suffer from ‘Pinterest stress’ when they see idealistic images of gardens, home decor, craft projects and recipes.

To make light of Pinners’ attempts to replicate flawless projects, Andersen hosts the site Pinterest Fail. Planet Fitness also created a “No Pintimidation” campaign that puts funny images into picture-perfect Pins (think cats, unicorns, bananas) to ease followers’ anxiety with the overarching message that consumers’ lives don’t have to be picture perfect.

The takeaway is similar for small business employees tasked with running Pinterest campaigns. Don’t stress if every product photo isn’t award-winning. Instead, share those fails with followers to connect on a personal level, using hashtags like #EpicPinterestFail to generate buzz around the subject.

During last week’s National Small Business Week Google+ Hangout about managing SMBs’ online reputations, expert panelists agreed that social accounts should be used to express small businesses’ personalities and show that there are actual people behind the presence. Occasionally sharing a bad photo or humorous social media content may provide just the right chance for SMBs to connect with their customers on a personal level.